REPORT

A New Climate for Peace

Taking Action on Climate and Fragility Risks

This independent report, commissioned by the G7 members, identifies seven compound climate-fragility risks that pose serious threats to the stability of states and societies in the decades ahead. Based on a thorough assessment of existing policies on climate change adaptation, development cooperation and humanitarian aid, and peacebuilding, the report recommends that the G7 take concrete action, both as individual members and jointly, to tackle climate-fragility risks and increase resilience to them.

BLOG

Resilience Compass

When climate change exacerbates conflicts and crises, resilience must be the compass for foreign policy. The Resilience Compass features news, reflections and opinions on climate change and fragility, with contributions from the Wilson Center’s New Security Beat, International Alert and guest authors.

RESOURCES

Factbook, Readings, Events

This collection of resources complements and extends the analysis of the report. It contains an interactive factbook allowing users to explore case studies from around the world and provides background readings and contextualized report and event summaries.

Thematic Reading

G7 Germany
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International Alert
The Wilson Center
New Security Beat agriculture conflict development environment featured Guest Contributor land livelihoods natural resources Sahel

Urban Elites’ Livestock Exacerbate Herder-Farmer Tensions in Africa’s Sudano-Sahel

14 June, 2019 by Matt Luizza

In recent years, conflict between herders and farmers for access to increasingly scarce natural resources in Africa’s Sudano-Sahel has escalated. While the problems fueling these tensions are both hyper-local and transnational in nature, one important piece of the puzzle has been overlooked. The real “elephant in the room” is who owns the livestock.

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New Security Beat biodiversity conflict conservation environment featured forests On the Beat protected areas security

Fostering Citizen Enforcement and Rule of Law Could Cut Down Illegal Logging

21 May, 2019 by Kyla Peterson

Civil society engagement is essential for environmental protection, especially in cases where institutional frameworks are weak and governance is lacking. Often, civilians are witnessing the illegal exploitation of resources and are better informed about crimes happening near their homes. They can help dismantle illegal enterprises such as rainforest logging. A new mobile app has been developed to make it easy for people to feed information into databases and contribute to better enforcement of environmental laws.